Sentinel-Echo.com

Local News

July 22, 2013

St. Joe unveils new training

Birthing simulator newest technology

LAUREL COUNTY, Ky. —



The cry of a newborn is a welcome sound in hospital delivery rooms across the world. 

But when the birth of a child is met with silence, nurses and doctors must quickly jump to action.

Learning how to respond in emergency situations involving childbirth procedures has taken a huge leap forward at Saint Joseph London, with the addition of the neonatal birthing simulator. The lifelike mannequins, named Noelle and Newborn Hal, are the latest investment in technology that will move the London facility into the newest realm of medical advancement techniques.

Noelle features a fully articulating body that can simulate childbirth and delivery that includes the head-first normal delivery, assisted delivery in which forceps and vacuum devices are required, shoulder dystocia and breech deliveries. Monitoring devices attached to Noelle’s body give students and staff feedback during these training deliveries, even monitoring when too much pressure is being exerted during normal deliveries.

Newborn Hal features lifelike qualities with breathing, crying, pulse, color and vital signs and can be hooked up to machines for oral and nasal intubation.

The $66,000 investment is the largest expenditure for the London facility to date and will allow staff and students to practice their skills in a risk-free, supportive environment where complex cases of patient care can be identified, re-created and practiced.

“Simulation is increasingly being used to educate and train health care professionals,” said Barry A. Stumbo, president of the Saint Joseph London Foundation. “Thanks to the generosity of our donors, Saint Joseph London staff will have an advanced tool for learning, training, and preparation.”

Saint Joseph London delivers approximately 1,100 babies each year and the addition of Noelle and Newborn Hal are a welcome technological addition.

“This will bring our competency to the next level,” said Mary Jo Westerfield, director of Women’s Services. “We can learn about the various types of C-sections, epidurals, and provide parent education — perhaps to a father who has never held a newborn baby before.”

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