Sentinel-Echo.com

Homepage

January 30, 2014

Saint Joseph London to pay $16.5 million settlement

Second largest federal health care fraud settlement in eastern Ky. district

LAUREL COUNTY, Ky. — Three years after the first claim against the London hospital was filed for alleged unnecessary heart procedures, Saint Joseph London has reached a settlement with the United States government.

The settlement was reached Tuesday, in which the London hospital agreed to pay $16.5 million to resolve allegations that it submitted false or fraudulent claims to the Medicare and Kentucky Medicaid programs.

When hundreds of lawsuits were filed alleging unnecessary cardiac procedures were being performed at Saint Joseph London by a group of cardiologists, the United States Attorney’s Office conducted an investigation into the issues.

The investigation revealed between Jan. 1, 2008 and Aug. 31, 2011, these cardiologists teamed together and performed “invasive cardiac procedures” on patients covered under Medicare and Medicaid. The procedures were not medically needed and violated the False Claims Act because the patients did not meet the guidelines under what is termed as “medically necessary.” Procedures included coronary stents, pacemakers, coronary artery bypass graft surgeries (CABGS) and diagnostic catheterizations. The standard reimbursement for medical procedures such as heart stents ranges between $10,000 and $15,000.

The settlement also resolves claims that Saint Joseph London teamed with these heart doctors in 2008 to provide the cardiac care for the hospital’s patients, thus violating the federal Stark Law and Anti-Kickback Statute. The agreements between the hospital and the doctors arranged for the doctors to refer their patients to the hospital. The government claims Medicare and Medicaid should not pay for claims that arose from the improper financial arrangements between the doctors and the hospital.

“We all rely on health care providers to make treatment decisions based on clinical, not financial, considerations,” said U.S. Attorney Kerry B. Harvey. “The conduct alleged in this case violates that fundamental trust and squanders scarce public resources set aside for legitimate health care needs. We will use every available tool to protect our federal health care programs and the patients who they serve.”

Text Only
Local News
Local Sports
titans.jpg

The 1971 T.C. Williams football team became famous thanks to the movie, “Remember the Titans.” Three of the original players will speak at this year’s North Laurel Football Banquet.

Opinion
Features
Galleries
Crime
Community Events
Must Read
Facebook
AP Video
Renewed Violence Taking Toll on Gaza Residents 2 Americans Detained in North Korea Seek Help US Employers Add 209K Jobs, Rate 6.2 Pct House GOP Optimistic About New Border Bill Gaza Truce Unravels; Israel, Hamas Trade Blame Raw: Tunisia Closes Borders With Libya Four Rescued From Crashed Plane Couple Channel Grief Into Soldiers' Retreat WWI Aviation Still Alive at Aerodrome in NY Raw: Rescuers at Taiwan Explosion Scene Raw: Woman Who Faced Death Over Faith in N.H. Clinton Before 9-11: Could Have Killed Bin Laden Netanyahu Vows to Destroy Hamas Tunnels Obama Slams Republicans Over Lawsuit House Leaders Trade Blame for Inaction
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Poll

Now that school is out, what are your family’s summer vacation plans?

A. No major plans. We will probably hang out around Laurel County.
B. Going to the beach!
C. Kentucky has a lot of wonderful state parks, and we plan to visit a few and enjoy quality family time.
     View Results