I have always called this tree Sarvis or serviceberry but in my researching this tree I found that is referred to as Juneberry.

The other common names come from it blooming in early spring when the shad run. That is where the names shadblow, shadbush and shadwood come from.

There are four different species of the Juneberry tree are also called Sarvis. They are all small trees that only grow up to 40 feet high and only to 16 inches through. Because these trees are small you won’t find them deep in the forest, instead they are in open areas where they get plenty of sunlight and will be easy to see. There are four trees the Juneberry family, Amelanchier species, only one of these four trees of those trees is found in this area this area. You will see the white blossoms of that tree throughout the eastern forests from March thru June and the berries form from June thru August. The berries are taste and good to use to make jelly out of and for pies but they are a favorite of song birds, game birds and many small mammals, as well as deer. So it is hard to get them before the wildlife eat them.

I have herd that if you were stranded in the woods and couldn’t find food that you could boil the inner bark of this tree and drink the water, after it cooled, to stay strong enough to find you way out.

The trees aren’t big enough to use as lumber but it is heavy and strong enough that it has been used to make handles for tools.

Thee trees in the genus of the Juneberry are so hard to separate that the botanists sometimes disagree on where to assign the trees or bushes. So if you disagree with anybody on which tree you are looking at or talking about don’t feel bad. It happens to the best of them and I run into that problem more than I would like to admit.

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