Yellow NutsedgeCyperus esculentus

I normally don't write about plants that I haven't photographed but last week I read about a weed that caused problems to us, so I thought I would research the plant and see if there is another side to the plant, Yellow Nutsedge and I found it to be very interesting.

I found that North America and Eurasia has a native plant that has become one of the worlds biggest pests. Until the 1950's it wasn't found in many other countries, whereas today it is all over the world.

It is raised, mainly in Egypt, Spain, and California, for animal feed but some countries grow it for a desert as a raw dish with honey. Some countries make a sweet drink from it called horchata. The tuber are said to taste like a starchy almond.

As a young plant it is hard to tell from grass because its leaves are similar to grass, but larger and its stem is triangular. When fully grown it can reach heights up to three feet. Its roots are rhizomes ( horizontal modified stem) that produce many tubers ( nut shaped modified stems). A plant can make up thousands of tubers and this can amount to millions of tubers per acre A farmer in Wisconsin reported 35,000,000 tubers per acre in one of his fields.

Yellow nutsedge has many common name, chufa, chufa sedge,nut grass, tiger nut, earth almond, ground almond and many others, all referring to its taste, shape or use. Any of these names is known by some people but not all. The only way to be sure what plant you are talking about it to use its scientific name Cyperus esculentus, which means " abundant edible sedge".

This plant has a long history in the U.S., about 9,000 years. Scientists say, they have found traces of tuber starch on tools at a scientific dig on the Mashantucket Pequot Reservation in Mashantucket Conn. It is also thought to be one of the oldest plants to be raised in Egypt. Dating back 6,000 years. It has also been used for medicine though the years but today it is only one of the worlds biggest pests.

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