Bluets — Houstonia caerulea

Bluets are a delicate sky blue perennial flower that is often over looked in the woods because they are so small. These flower only grow to eight inches or less and their blossoms are less than one half inch across. Unless you find them in big clumps, they won’t get your attention a lot of the time.

This flower is also known as Quaker Ladies, and Azure Bluet. To make things a little more confusing the books that I used to research them called used Houstonia caerulea for their scientific name but some authors have put them in the genus Heyotis but use the same species name. These small differences are hug when you talk to people that use different reference. Regardless of which genus it is in it in the Madder family because both genus are a madder.

Like many other plants they have been used as a medicine, in the past. The Cherokee Indians used a tea made from the leaves to treat bed-wetting.

These flowers grow in moist to wet soil where they get some sun but mostly shaded. They like woods that have open shade with a few hours of sun and shaded meadows. They bloom from late March to early April thru July from Maine to Wisconsin south to the Gulf of Mexico. You can find them in most open woods in Laurel County but you may have to look for them. They are a common flower in eastern Kentucky but as you go west, in the state, they get harder to find.

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